NewTechKids is super excited to announce two new 2019 summer bootcamps which will combine computer science and maker activities. The workshops will be taught in partnership with Maakplaats 021, the Maker education initiative of the Amsterdam Public Library, the largest public library in Europe. During the all-day bootcamps, kids ages 8-12 will enjoy hands-on activities related to creating tech prototypes and designing and producing physical objects in the Maker Lab. Bootcamp #1: July 15-19, 2019

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NewTechKids works with primary schools in the Amsterdam area to help introduce computational thinking and computer science programs as part of formal school curriculum. Our programs integrate pedagogy, didactics, teaching approaches and classroom management and are based on the curriculum, lesson plans and teaching materials that we've developed, tested and taught over the last three years. Below are some of the schools where we've taught: Leonardo da Vinci School, Amsterdam NewTechKids teaches computer science programs

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NewTechKids is pleased to announce its Fall 2017 line up of activities. We have spent the summer developing and testing new approaches to computer science education in partnership with our non-profit foundation, Stichting NewTechKids. During two, brand-new bootcamps, we taught computer science concepts along with a stronger focus on technological literacy. This took the form of presenting technology case studies and concepts for new technology and leading in-depth class discussions on the implications of technology

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Last week, NewTechKids became the subject of Wittenberg University's Project Week in Amsterdam. For five days, business students dove into NewTechKids' business model and selected a country where we could expand our business: curriculum, lesson plans and teacher training programs. (We discounted the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Scandinavia, Finland, Australia and New Zealand as these countries already have thriving computer science education in place.) Their challenge: select a country, prove that computational thinking and computer

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In early October, I was in South Korea to speak at the International Symposium of Science Museums. My subject: NewTechKids and our approach to teaching computer science and computational thinking skills to primary school-aged children. I joined representatives from some of the world's leading science museums, including the Smithsonian, the Getty Museum, Science Center Singapore and the National Science Museum of Korea. We discussed the social responsibility of science museums and the important role that

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NewTechKids is gearing up for our Fall activities and we want to hear from schools which are interested in our computer science and 21st century skills programs. We teach primary school children (4-6, 7-9 and 10-12 years) fundamental computer science and programming concepts which underlie all devices, programming languages, apps and technology. Here's how schools can partner with NewTechKids to bring computer science education to their students: hire NewTechKids teachers to teach computer science and programming

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On Monday, February 8th, NewTechKids co-hosted a brainstorm session with Amsterdam's new Ripley's Believe It or Not Museum. Still under construction, the museum provided the ideal blank slate for re-imagining how primary school students engage with museum content. Participants developed ideas on how to develop school programs for museums which leverage technology to create engaging experiences. The goal was to develop ideas for experiences which encourage students (8-12 years) to discover new information, think critically, and

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NewTechKids sees technology education as a means to help kids develop 21st century skills: problem-solving, critical thinking, logic, pattern recognition, creativity and communication. It doesn't matter if children don't create the perfect code, design a popular app or create a beautiful 3D printed product. We are happy as long as it's obvious they are thinking, experimenting, designing, failing, collaborating and learning. Most kids don't receive any technology, programming or computer science education in primary school. This is

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